Boris Lvin (bbb) wrote,
Boris Lvin
bbb

911

Спасибо manualу - навел на статью о (предполагаемом) ливанском террористе: http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2001/09/15/lebanon-family.htm

Сохраню здесь же. Статья - в ключе того же заявления саудовского дипломата, о котором см. выше, http://www.livejournal.com/talkpost.bml?itemid=10765491

Пока - укладывается в теорию о том, что ребята не были связаны с Нагруженным Мусорным Ведром (НМВ). То есть как бы дети из приличных семей, учатся техническим делам, в какой-то момент (ориентировочно - года два назад) сдвигаются на религиозно-политической почве, образуют узкий кружок, задумывают акт, готовят, совершают. Родители могут вообще не знать, могут догадываться о чем-то - вряд ли посвящены в планы. В этой ситуации оказываются объяснимы и деньги, необходимые для операции, включая обучение и т.д. - для этого достаточны состоятельные родители, а вовсе не подпольные миллионеры.

Итак, статья (наверно, ее можно найти просто как статью AP, но лень искать):

Family: Suspected hijacker was merely passenger

AL-MARJ, Lebanon (AP) - The Lebanese family of a man named as a hijacker in the attacks on the United States expressed disbelief Saturday, saying if their relative was on one of the four doomed flights he would have been an innocent passenger, not a terrorist. "Concerning Ziad Jarrah, whose name was mentioned by news agencies, we cannot imagine that this boy would ever carry out such an act," said his uncle, Nazem Jarrah. "We stress that his upbringing will never lead him to do something like this." The FBI on Friday released names of the 19 men it identified as the hijackers of the four planes used in Tuesday's terrorist attacks on the United States. One of the men was identified as Ziad Jarrahi, and U.S. aviation authorities listed a Ziad Jarrah as holding a pilot's license.

The difference in spellings of the last name - Jarrah and Jarrahi - could not be immediately reconciled. Differences in transliterations of Arabic names to English are common.

Earlier Saturday, an official Lebanese statement issued in Beirut quoted a security source as saying that Ziad Samir Jarrah, 26, had been in Hamburg, Germany, for the past four years studying flight engineering.

The Lebanese statement did not refer to the U.S. attacks or say why the unusual statement was made, but it appeared to be in response to U.S. media reports.

The Lebanese statement also referred to a crackdown nearly two years ago on a Lebanese group linked to Saudi exile Osama bin Laden, identified by Washington as the prime suspect in Tuesday's attacks on New York and Washington.

Authorities had found no links between that group or any militant groups and the Jarrah family, it said.

In a separate statement, the government which has repeatedly condemned the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, said "Lebanon prefers to await the results of investigations and not to jump into any early conclusions."

"Lebanon, its government and people have no link whatsoever with the developments in the United States," it added.

At the Jarrah family home in the village of Al-Marj, 30 miles east of Beirut in the eastern Bekaa Valley, 26-year-old Ziad Jarrah was described as a secular-minded student who had a girlfriend and drank alcohol.

"What we know is that he was studying flight engineering ... we didn't have any information that he was studying to fly," said another uncle, Jamal Jarrah.

His uncle Nazem Jarrah said Ziad Jarrah telephoned his father from the Miami area two days before the attacks to thank him for a bank transfer to pay for his tuition. They haven't heard from him since Tuesday's attacks and have been unable to contact him by telephone.

"If he was actually on the plane, then he is one of the passengers, not a hijacker," Nazem Jarrah said. "He didn't pray or fast. He never cared about politics or organization. All he cared about is having fun and drinking beer."

Ziad Jarrah's other uncle said his nephew last visited Lebanon in February to check on his sick father.

According to the FBI, suspected hijacker Ziad Jarrahi was on United Flight 93 which flew out of Newark, N.J., and crashed in a field 80 miles from Pittsburgh as three other jets struck the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.
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