Boris Lvin (bbb) wrote,
Boris Lvin
bbb

Ханссен признался: Полякова выдал он

Although Hanssen said he betrayed Russian army general Dimitri Polyakov in 1979, the Soviet KGB did not arrest Polyakov until 1986. The legendary agent, codenamed "Top Hat" by his original FBI recruiters, was executed two years later.
...
Until Hanssen's disclosure, it was believed that Polyakov was one of more than a dozen U.S. agents first betrayed to the KGB by CIA turncoat Aldrich H. Ames, who was arrested in 1994.


Далее - целиком


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A2451-2001Oct3.html

Hanssen Gave Away Identity Of One of U.S.'s Top Sources

By Walter Pincus
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, October 4, 2001; Page A06

Robert P. Hanssen, the convicted FBI spy, has told government debriefers that in his first round of espionage for Moscow 22 years ago, he gave away the identity of one America's best intelligence sources inside the Soviet military, according to lawyers familiar with the case.

Although Hanssen said he betrayed Russian army general Dimitri Polyakov in 1979, the Soviet KGB did not arrest Polyakov until 1986. The legendary agent, codenamed "Top Hat" by his original FBI recruiters, was executed two years later.

Hanssen first made the disclosure during plea negotiations with prosecutors in June, and he has provided more details during subsequent debriefings, according to the lawyers. Hanssen's identification of Polyakov was first reported in yesterday's Los Angeles Times.

Until Hanssen's disclosure, it was believed that Polyakov was one of more than a dozen U.S. agents first betrayed to the KGB by CIA turncoat Aldrich H. Ames, who was arrested in 1994.

Analysts at the FBI and CIA have been trying to determine why the Soviets allowed Polyakov to operate for at least six years after he was fingered by Hanssen. One theory is bureaucratic rivalry: Hanssen may have passed the information to the GRU, Soviet military intelligence, the service to which Polyakov belonged. Rather than immediately arresting him, the GRU merely isolated him, protecting its own reputation.

"The possibility is that the GRU never told the KGB and just tried to limit what was exposed," said a U.S. intelligence source.

Hanssen's disclosure may explain why Polyakov was suddenly recalled to Moscow in 1980 from an overseas posting. It was the first time the general had been moved that abruptly since the FBI first recruited him in the United States in 1963, according to intelligence sources.

"He never came out [of the Soviet Union] again," a former CIA official said. Attempts by the CIA to contact him in Moscow in the mid-1980s were unsuccessful, other than determining he was still alive, intelligence sources said.

Altogether, Hanssen has confessed to betraying three Soviet citizens who were spying for the United States and who were subsequently executed. Ames's disclosures are believed to have resulted in 10 deaths.

In his deal with federal prosecutors, Hanssen agreed to plead guilty to espionage and to cooperate in extensive debriefings by U.S. intelligence officials. In return, he avoided the death penalty and secured his wife's right to receive his FBI pension. His formal sentencing has been postponed to ensure his cooperation, but he is expected to spend the remainder of his life in prison.
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